“Ruins of Time” wins Chinese sci-fi award

 

 

 

“Ruins of Time” wins

Chinese sci-fi award

 

By Yao Yuan and Yue Ruifang

 

 

The 2014 Xingyun (Nebula) Award for Global Chinese Science Fiction was announced on Sunday of November 2, with the best saga novel prize awarded to a story about a world trapped in an endless loop.

Ruins of Time, written by Baoshu from Chinese mainland, tells of a world where everything, except the memories of some people, would return to a fixed point-in-time every 20 hours, as a result of a disastrous experiment that distorted time.

American Chinese writer Ken Liu won special contribution prize for translating Chinese science fiction, including best-seller The Three-Body Problem, into English.

Smart Life by Ping Zongqi from Taiwan won the prize for best short story.

More than 2,000 sci-fi writers and readers from China and abroad attended the event in Beijing, held by Guokr.com, a website dedicated to popularizing science, this year.

Though seen as an important way to popularize science and promote imagination, sci-fi has yet to break into the mainstream in China.

The annual event, the only international awards for Chinese-language sci-fi writers, was organized by the World Chinese Science Fiction Association, which is based in Chengdu, capital of southwest China’s Sichuan Province. It was launched in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 Let’s share Chinese version !!!

第五届全球华语科幻星云奖出炉

 

 大陆作者宝树的《时间之墟》获长篇小说金奖

 台湾作者平宗奇的《智能型人生》获短篇小说金奖

 

作者: 岳瑞芳 姚远

 

第五届全球华语科幻星云奖2日在北京举行颁奖典礼,“80后”作者宝树的《时间之墟》获长篇小说金奖,短篇小说金奖由台湾作者平宗奇的《智能型人生》夺得,中篇小说金奖则首次出现空缺。

此外,杨鹏的《校园三剑客》、飞氘的《中国科幻大片》分获最佳少儿原创科幻图书奖和最佳科幻图书奖,台湾作家黄海的《科幻文学解构》和大陆作家吴岩的《科幻六讲》同时获得最佳科幻评论奖,刘维佳、陈茜和姬少亭分获最佳科幻编辑、最具潜力新作者和最佳科幻迷金奖。

值得关注的是,美国华裔科幻作家刘宇昆因为把《三体》等优秀中国科幻小说成功译介到西方,被授予特别贡献奖,另外两个特别贡献奖分别颁发给了《中国科幻银河奖精选作品集》和知名科普网站果壳网。

此外,星云奖还新设最具科幻创意发现发明奖,以鼓励具有未来前瞻性的科技产品原创。

全球华语科幻星云奖成立于2010年,由总部位于成都的世界华人科幻协会评选并颁发,每年评选一次。这一奖项不仅已成为检阅华语科幻创作的标杆,还是观察华人想象力和创造力的窗口。

记者了解到,由果壳网承办的本届星云奖共吸引2000多名来自两岸三地及北美、欧洲、日本、新加坡等地的科幻作者、译者和爱好者与会,最终200多部(篇)科幻作品入选最后的评比环节。

曾因创作享誉盛名的科幻小说《三体》而荣获第二届全球华语科幻星云奖金奖的科幻作家刘慈欣,为本届星云奖的颁奖仪式创作了话剧《三体新传》,演出获得成功并受到科幻迷的热烈追捧。

 

 

 

 

 PHOTO REPORT | November 1, 2014

 

Han Song, Chinese journalist and famous sci-fi writer, speaks at the opening forum for 2014

Xingyun (Nebula) Award for Global Chinese Science Fiction in Beijing on November 1, 2014.

The awards list will be released on November 2, 2014 in Beijing. The Xingyun Award, an

international award for Chinese-language sci-fi writers, is organized by the World Chinese

Science Fiction Association based in Chengdu, capital of southwest China’s Sichuan Province.  

Photos by Li Yibo

 

Ken Liu, a famous American Chinese sci-fi writer, gives a speech titled “The future in my

eyes – the Robot Revolution” at the opening forum for 2014 Xingyun (Nebula) Award for

Global Chinese Science Fiction in Beijing on November 1, 2014.   Photo by Li Yibo

 

Zhu Ren, a Chinese sci-fi writer, gives a speech titled “The future in machine’s eyes – the

Machine Revolution,take 2″ at the opening forum for 2014 Xingyun (Nebula) Award for

Global Chinese Science Fiction in Beijing on November 1, 2014.   Photo by Li Yibo

 

Theoretical physicist Li Miao speaks at the opening forum for 2014 Xingyun (Nebula) Award

for Global Chinese Science Fiction in Beijing on November 1, 2014.   Photo by Li Yibo

 Sci-fi writers and scholars communicate at the opening forum for 2014 Xingyun (Nebula)

Award for Global Chinese Science Fiction in Beijing on November 1, 2014.   Photo by Li Yibo

 

 

 

 

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China marks 2,565 anniversary of Confucius’ birth

 

A memorial ceremony to mark the 2,565th anniversary of Confucius’ birth is held

at the Confucius Temple in Qufu, east China’s Shandong Province, on September 28, 2014.

Photo by Xu Suhui

A memorial ceremony to mark the 2,565th anniversary of Confucius’ birth is held at the

Confucius Temple in Qufu, east China’s Shandong Province, on September 28, 2014.

Photos by Xu Suhui

A ceremony is held to mark the 2,565th anniversary of Confucius’ birth at the Yuelu

Academy in Changsha, capital of central China’s Hunan Province, on September 28, 2014.

Photo by Li Ga

A ceremony is held to mark the 2,565th anniversary of Confucius’ birth at the Yuelu Academy

in Changsha, capital of central China’s Hunan Province, on September 28, 2014.

Photos by Li Ga

 

 

 

China marks 2,565 

anniversary of

Confucius’ birth

 

By Zhong Qun and  Liu Baosen

 

Ceremonies were held in a number of Chinese cities on Sunday of September 28 to celebrate the 2565th anniversary of the birth of ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius.

In Qufu City, hometown of Confucius in east China’s Shandong Province, more than 4,000 people marched toward the Confucius Temple in a grand ceremony on Sunday morning, as government officials, scholars, students and the descendants of Confucius recited the classics of the ancient philosopher.

Elsewhere, some 300 people bowed to the statue of Confucius in Yuelu Academy in Changsha, capital of central China’s Hunan Province, while in the southwestern Guiyang City, around 300 pupils, dressed in traditional Han clothes, read classics of the educator in the local Confucius School on Sunday.

Confucius (551-479 BC), an educator and philosopher, founded the school of thought Confucianism that deeply influenced later generations. He was also the first Chinese person to set up private schools and enroll students from all walks of life.

He is believed to be born on Sept. 28.

For thousands of years, Confucius has been regarded as a symbol of China’s traditional culture, as well as the country’s intellectuals.

He was deified as a great sage in ancient China, and despised as a regressive pedant during the decade-long Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).

After the reform and opening up policy in the late 1970s, respect of traditional Chinese culture has been restored and Confucius Institutes have become a feature of the Chinese culture going global.

Annual commemorations of Confucius started in BC 478, the year after his death.

 

 

 

 

 

CHINA VOICE

Rejecting Confucius Institutes

not helpful to understand China

 

By Liu Tong and Li Huizi

 

Nobody expected the Confucius Institutes (CI) to grow so rapidly when it first opened a campus in Seoul in 2004. Today, it has 465 institutes in 123 countries and regions and another 713 Confucius Classrooms operating in middle and primary schools worldwide.

But criticisms and calls to ban the spread of the institutes haven’t stopped.

Without doubt, CI has its problems, in management style, hiring methods or quality of its teachers. But such problems are inevitable considering its rapid expansion and can be rectified. None have problems so serious to justify the call by some to reject CI completely.

CI has just entered its 10th year. Compared with its counterparts such as Goethe Institute, which was established in 1951 and the British Council, which was founded in 1934, CI is still in its infancy.

Faced with the popularity of the Chinese culture and Chinese language study, the critics chose to ignore the true reasons behind the rapid expansion of CI — it well served people’s needs to learn Chinese language and Chinese culture.

A glimpse into many English-speaking websites shows the scarcity of information many foreign people know about China, a country which only gained the world spotlight in recent years.

It is not uncommon to come across websites with quiz titles asking “How much do you know about China other than the Great Wall and pandas?” In many ways, CI is a bridge to help Chinese people and foreigners know more about each other. It is no more different than the Goethe Institute, the British Council and the French Alliance.

“Confucius Institutes belong to China and the world as well,” Chinese President Xi Jinping said in a recent speech commemorating Confucius’ birthday.

He urged promotion of civilization among mankind to improve people’s heart-to-heart communication.

“Harmony is the most valuable of all things,” the great Chinese sage Confucius said more than two thousand years ago. In choosing Confucius as the name of an organization promoting the study of Chinese language abroad and international cultural exchange and relations, China wanted it to become a platform that can transcend ideology, social system differences and misunderstanding.

Rather, some people in the West are turning it into a politically-charged tool to defame and smear China’s goodwill to communicate with the outside world.

Recently, the University of Chicago announced it had suspend negotiations to renew its agreement to host a Confucius Institute, meaning Chinese language study in the university would cease soon.

Though the university did not detail the reasons behind the suspension, many believed it was linked to the American Association of University Professors boycott of CI.

By shutting the door of a Confucius Institute, the University of Chicago not only denied students an opportunity to learn Chinese and Chinese culture, but also a channel to reduce misunderstandings.